Women, politics and the 1723 oaths of allegiance to George I

My article on the above is now available online on the Historical Journal website.

In other news, Dr Alex Craven is producing a transcription of the City of London returns which will be integrated into the London Metropolitan Archives’ catalogue, helping users research early eighteenth-century Londoners. In due course, we plan to hold a workshop showcasing the transcription and enriched catalogue, illustrated through an exploration of the biographies of a number of subscribers.

Women, politics and the 1723 oaths of allegiance to George I

I’m very pleased to announce that my article entitled ‘Women, politics and the 1723 oaths of allegiance to George I’ has been accepted for publication by The Historical Journal. You can find a copy of the accepted manuscript version of the article below. The final version of the article will appear in The Historical Journal in due course. I am grateful to Cambridge University Press for permission to reproduce the accepted manuscript.

Women, politics and 1723 oaths accepted manuscript web version

1723 oath pun

In a letter to the Earl of Oxford, Dr Thomas Tudway reported that in Sir Robert Walpole’s county (Norfolk) ‘where some gentlemen met at an adjourned sessions, for the people of those parts to take the oaths, … it being hot weather, the justices called out to have the windows opened, to let in the air, upon which a gentleman who had just taken them cried out, “Why, what the devil have we been doing all this while, I thought we had come hither to swear to keep out the h[ei]r.”’

Report on the Manuscripts of the Duke of Portland preserved at Welbeck Abbey, vol. v (Norwich, HMSO, 1899), p. 638.

In other news, I will be posting an updated version of the finding list shortly with new oath roll finds for Cumbria and Kent included.

1723 oath rolls for Poole borough

The returns for Poole (ref. DC/PL/B/10/1/9-14) comprise five sheets of parchment, each one headed with the texts of the oaths in English followed by Latin preambles announcing the date and place of subscription (usually the Guildhall, Poole). The subscriptions start on 9th Sept 1723. The latest is possibly 24th December, though some of the preambles are very faded. The total number of signatures and marks on the roll is approx 354 of which 111 were identifiable as women (so just under a third). Besides one note identifying an individual as notary public there are no other descriptions by names. In a number of places, women’s subscriptions seemed to be bunched together so that on some lists they represent the majority signing.